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Wednesday, May 1
9am

The last program of the year features Mr. Ron Cowell, from the Education Policy and Leadership Center. LUSSC member school districts receive 2 seats at no charge and all other attendees are $65/person. Please register here by Thursday, April 25th.

Iacocca Hall Wood Dining Room

Thursday, May 9
4pm

Join us on May 9 from 4-6pm at Lehigh's College of Education in the Iacocca Tower to celebrate another successful year of academics, research and community. The program will consist of poster presentations by our current students, awards ceremony and networking with school psychology faculty, students, alums and supervisors. We hope you can join us!

Iacocca Hall, Tower

Friday, May 10
7am

The Special Education Law Conference is a one-day program that provides a year-in-review case law keynote and various break-out sessions on Friday, May 10, 2019 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:50 p.m.

Iacocca Hall Wood Dining Hall, 2nd Floor (A wing)

Friday, May 10
8am

This event is closed as we have reached capacity. This workshop offers foundational trauma knowledge for clinicians, educators, and administrators who are interested in learning about evidence-based trauma treatments and/or trauma-informed care. It highlights ways to share trauma theory with family members and across systems (e.g. schools, child welfare workers, mental health, medical practitioners, police) as we work jointly to lessen the impact of trauma exposure.

Room 4430

Saturday, May 11
8am

The Centennial School 5K is held on the scenic cross-country trails of Lehigh University’s Goodman Campus, Bethlehem, PA. Use the link below to familiarize yourself with the 5K course. We hope to see many families at the race! For those competitive runners, the 5K will be professionally timed by Pretzel City Sports. Those families, kids, and dogs looking for a less competitive morning will have the opportunity to participate in the two-mile walk. If you wish to receive a T-shirt you must register for the race on or before April 23, 2019.

Cross Country Start and Finish Line

Saturday, May 11
9am

Rounds are a an open circle discussion between professionals, educators, administrators and people from all backgrounds who share an interest in how Race, Class, Gender and Privilege impact our lives, our schools and our society. We may have guest speakers, small group discussions or other presentations where we get to the real nitty gritty and have deep open conversations about our roles regarding these issues. We share perspectives and discuss ways, such as using the Arts, to effectively address these challenges. Come join us! We will meet in Building C Room 210 (Mountaintop Campus). A light breakfast and/or Coffee and Tea will be available at 9 and we have our gathering for sharing, and growth, from 9:30-noon. Rounds are free of charge and are open to all. Contact Jon Drescher for more information: jod410@lehigh.edu

Building C 210

Wednesday, May 15
4pm

After 30 years of service, Dr. George P. White is retiring from Lehigh University.

Iacocca Hall, Wood Dining Hall

Thursday, May 16
5pm

Seeking social studies educators and school leaders in Lehigh Valley, PA and the surrounding region to join us in discussions about civic education and civic opportunities for students. If you enjoy collaborating with others, we hope to see you there! Topics include Digital Challenges to Democracy, School Board Simulation, Media Literacy, and Digital Citizenship. Register here by May 14th: https://forms.gle/hfNyVitni3pqMkgJ8.

PBS39 ESSA Community Room, 839 Sesame St., Bethlehem, PA 18105

Friday, May 17
8am

Dr. Lauren Moskowitz, Ph.D presents "Assessing and Treating Anxiety and Related Problem Behaviors and in Autism Spectrum Disorder." Although there are numerous studies demonstrating the successful assessment and treatment of anxiety in neurotypical children, comparatively less is known about how to assess and treat anxiety in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), particularly those individuals with co-occurring intellectual disability. This presentation will discuss how anxiety presents within ASD, the functional assessment of anxiety in children with ASD, and how to treat anxiety in children with ASD. Interventions discussed will incorporate strategies from Positive Behavior Support (PBS), Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Case examples of children both with and without intellectual disability will be presented. More information to come!

Iacocca Hall Wood Dining Hall

Sunday, May 19
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Sunday, May 19
12am

Parking Services will be closed from 12:00pm to 1:00pm beginning Friday, May 17, 2019 through Thursday August 15, 2019.

Sunday, May 19
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Sunday, May 19
12pm

Roman Catholic Graduation Mass 12:10 p.m., Packer Memorial Church Led by Fr. Eugene Ritz, Chancellor Diocese of Allentown, Celebrant and Homilist

Packer Memorial Church

Sunday, May 19
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Sunday, May 19
2pm

All doctoral candidates who have completed their requirements by May 3 and are approved to graduate are eligible to participate in this ceremony. Approved candidates will receive a special email invitation from the Provost's Office and must RSVP to confirm their participation in the ceremony.

Zoellner Arts Center Baker Hall

Sunday, May 19
4pm

Led by University Chaplain Lloyd Steffen, the Baccalaureate program includes outstanding choral music and a presentation or “farewell address” by a person of high distinction to graduating seniors. The original Baccalaureate ceremony dates back to the 14th Century where it was held at Oxford University. The Baccalaureate service lasts one hour and begins with a musical prelude slightly before 4:00 p.m. Students representing different religious traditions participate in the program. Past notes of appreciation received from parents, guests, and students indicate that the service has been a meaningful part of the Commencement activities. *The service is standing room only. In recent years, speakers have been placed on the patio in front of the church because of the crowd. To be assured a seat, please arrive early.

Packer Memorial Church

Sunday, May 19
10am

A revolutionary. Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer (b. 1935), is a pioneer of the digital revolution in contemporary photography, one of the first photographers to manipulate his images digitally. Because of its mechanical nature, photography has often been misconstrued an unbiased reproduction of a single moment, a snapshot of the exact truth – something that Meyer actively disputes in his work. Meyer is renowned, not only for digital manipulation, but also for his powerful and provocative photographs that share his complex vision of reality. Meyer insists that all photographs – manipulated or not – are equally true and untrue. He argues that digital manipulation continues in the tradition of so-called “straight photography” in which unwanted details are cropped out, or the photographer asks his subject to step out of the shadows into better light. Seen this way, a photographer digitally editing a photograph is no different from a photographer offering stage directions from behind the camera. Both take liberties with the “truth” in service to the photographer’s vision. This exhibition showcases Meyer’s approach toward capturing the truth of a moment, complete with concrete reality of memories and emotions. Exhibition hours are Monday – Thursday 8AM – 10PM, Friday 8AM – 5PM, and Weekends: 10AM – 5PM. Image Detail: Pedro Meyer, Explosion of Green Chairs (Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, Mexico), 1991/1993/2008

E.W.F.M. Library / Mart Library / Computing Center

Sunday, May 19
11am

The founders of Lehigh University saw art as integral to a well-rounded education. Following in the footsteps of Thomas Jefferson, who made his personal art collection accessible to students and faculty at the University of Virginia, Lehigh University’s first president, Henry Coppée, declared art one of the “elementary branches” of education. Art has been part of the university since its beginning in 1865. By 1926 the university was actively collecting and exhibiting works of art, and in 1935 the first gallery facilities were established to house the permanent collection. From these humble beginnings the Lehigh University Art Galleries · Teaching Museum was formed. Today, the permanent collection numbers over 15,000 works of art, spanning many cultures and centuries. Although the collection has evolved and grown, the mission has stayed the same, to inspire, develop, and promote visual literacy and cultural understanding, providing educational opportunities across all areas of study. This extensive exhibition, on view throughout two galleries, features highlights from the university’s world-class collection, including works by Pierre Bonnard, Margaret Bourke-White, Albrecht Dürer, Wifredo Lam, Charles Burchfield, Jasper Johns, Diane Arbus, Jacob Lawrence, Robert Mapplethorpe, Henri Matisse, and many more. Exhibition hours are Wednesday through Saturday 11 AM – 5 PM and Sunday 1 PM – 5 PM. The Main and Lower Galleries are CLOSED Mondays and Tuesdays. Image Detail: Marsden Hartley, Fruit in Basket, 1922, oil on canvas

Zoellner Arts Center Main Gallery

Monday, May 20
12am

Registration and Academic Services summer hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 8:15AM to 4:45 PM Thursday 9:30 AM to 4:45 PM Friday 8:15AM to 4:00PM, closed 12-1:00 PM

Monday, May 20
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Monday, May 20
12am

Parking Services will be closed from 12:00pm to 1:00pm beginning Friday, May 17, 2019 through Thursday August 15, 2019.

Monday, May 20
12am

The CSO's annual Move Out Collection Drive will take place from Wednesday, May 8th to Friday, May 24th. Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to donate their new/gently used items instead of dumping them. We have drop off locations in residence halls and at Lamberton from 10am to 5pm. Donated items will be sold at the Great South Side Sale. All money from the sale goes to children's programming for south Bethlehem Homework Clubs.

Monday, May 20
12am

NavigateLU is a new program through the Office of First-Year Experience that is replacing the evoLUtion Seminar. These individual meetings with students will aid them to set academic and personal goals, consider resources for success, and encourage thoughtful reflection. More information and applications can be found at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff.

Monday, May 20
12am

The Summer Reading Committee is excited to announce the 2019 selection, Carry On, by Lisa Fenn! Themes from the book that we are excited to discuss with first-year students will be around overcoming barriers, the cycle of poverty, family and community, active citizenship, and exploration of identity such as race, class, and disability. The Summer Reading discussion takes place during Orientation on Sunday, August 25. Faculty, staff, and graduate students are encouraged to sign up to be a discussion leader at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff. A free copy of the book will be provided to you along with support materials to aid the conversation.

Monday, May 20
12am

The Center for Career & Professional Development is moving! That is right, we are packing up and moving to Maginnes Hall on the 5th floor. The physical move will take place May 20 - 24 and the center will be closed during this time. Stay tuned for more details and sneak peeks through our instagram: Lehighcareercenter

Monday, May 20
12am

University Day Commencement For more information see the Academic Calendar

Monday, May 20
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Monday, May 20
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Monday, May 20
10am

Commencement Ceremony General Information Goodman Stadium gates and Stabler Arena doors, on Lehigh's Goodman Campus, open at 8:45 a.m. We strongly encourage guests to arrive and be seated no later than 9:30 a.m. to avoid traffic backups and parking delays. In addtion, all bags will be checked upon entering. The ceremony will begin promptly at 10:00 a.m. The ceremony should last until approximately 12:45 p.m. For those making restaurant reservations after the ceremony, allow yourself enough travel time and anticipate traffic delays. In the event of severe weather, Commencement will be held inside Stabler Arena and divided into two abbreviated ceremonies at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. For more details, click on Severe Weather Information. For your comfort and convenience, an indoor ceremony viewing site will be available in Stabler Arena located south of Goodman Stadium. Shuttles will be available to transport guests between the stadium and arena during the ceremony. If you think you might take advantage of the alternate viewing site, it is recommended that you park in the lots surrounding Stabler Arena. General parking is available on Goodman Campus in the lots adjacent to Stabler Arena. Parking attendants will direct cars to parking areas that are located approximately 600 yards from the stadium. Individuals who require special parking or seating due to a disability, please click on mobility-impaired parking and seating options or contact the Office of University Events at (610) 758-4682 or inuday@lehigh.edu. Students from Lehigh’s four colleges will participate at this ceremony. For the benefit of all graduates and their families, please demonstrate courtesy by remaining in your seat for the entire ceremony. NOTE: Access to the stadium field will not be permitted during the ceremony. Cell phones should be silenced during the ceremony. Drones are prohibited on Lehigh campus. Alcoholic beverages, smoking, and bags larger than 14" x 14" are not permitted in Goodman Stadium. Small purses and diaper bags are permitted. Immediately following the ceremony, all graduates are invited to meet with family and friends at their college tent located on the south side and outside of Goodman Stadium. Limited seating available. Tweet with us during Commencement using #lehighgrad. Find more information about professional photographs, severe weather, maps and directions, or ordering roses for your graduate.

Goodman Stadium

Monday, May 20
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Monday, May 20
9am

Scale is relative. Large objects can loom over us and overwhelm. We shrink when confronted with a vast expanse, real or imaginary. Conversely, as our relative size grows larger, we surround, engulf, and contain smaller forms like a suitcase, a baby, or a grain of rice. Surprisingly, small spaces can also open portals to miniature worlds, while large forms can feel finite and contained.Artists take these effects seriously. Decisions about scale are often the first an artist makes when selecting the size of a canvas or a tool. The new exhibition Scale Shift: Large and Small Works features pairs of works with similar motifs that vary widely in scale. Visitors are invited to experience their own changing perception of relative size and imaginary space as they view these large and small works from the LUAG permanent collection. Scale Shift: Large and Small Works continues until May 24, 2019 in the Siegel Gallery, Iacocca Hall. Hours are Monday through Thursday 9 AM – 10 PM and Friday 9 AM – 5 PM. Image credit: Naoto Nakagawa, Silent Vision, 1974, Acrylic on canvas

Iacocca Hall Siegel Gallery

Monday, May 20
8am

A revolutionary. Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer (b. 1935), is a pioneer of the digital revolution in contemporary photography, one of the first photographers to manipulate his images digitally. Because of its mechanical nature, photography has often been misconstrued an unbiased reproduction of a single moment, a snapshot of the exact truth – something that Meyer actively disputes in his work. Meyer is renowned, not only for digital manipulation, but also for his powerful and provocative photographs that share his complex vision of reality. Meyer insists that all photographs – manipulated or not – are equally true and untrue. He argues that digital manipulation continues in the tradition of so-called “straight photography” in which unwanted details are cropped out, or the photographer asks his subject to step out of the shadows into better light. Seen this way, a photographer digitally editing a photograph is no different from a photographer offering stage directions from behind the camera. Both take liberties with the “truth” in service to the photographer’s vision. This exhibition showcases Meyer’s approach toward capturing the truth of a moment, complete with concrete reality of memories and emotions. Exhibition hours are Monday – Thursday 8AM – 10PM, Friday 8AM – 5PM, and Weekends: 10AM – 5PM. Image Detail: Pedro Meyer, Explosion of Green Chairs (Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, Mexico), 1991/1993/2008

E.W.F.M. Library / Mart Library / Computing Center

Monday, May 20
8am

In 1966, James Brown sang “It’s a man’s world!” Over the past year that statement has been shaken to its knees. Feminism, women’s rights, and women’s stories are front and center in the United States and across the world. The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have empowered women to continue speaking up about issues of sexual harassment and assault. A record number of women are running for political office, and – although much work remains to be done – women are and being celebrated in every field imaginable. In printmaking, The Future Is Female, but so is the past. With or without the visibility they deserve, women artists have engaged the art of printmaking from the beginning. Requiring technical mastery, physical strength, and stamina, printmaking—or the art of producing multiple images or impressions from a single plate or matrix—has its origins in 8th century Japan where designs were rubbed onto paper from wooden blocks. By the 15th century in Europe, the availability of inexpensive paper and the invention of the printing press led to a proliferation of printed images in a variety of techniques. The second half of the 20th century witnessed an explosion of interest in the creative potential of printmaking methods such as etching, engraving, lithography, woodcut, and silkscreen among others. Today, women artists continue to use these various techniques to tell their stories, exploring themes such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and/or economic class. This exhibition highlights contemporary women artists in the LUAG Teaching Museum permanent collection, including Faith Ringgold, Janet Fish, Maud Morgan, Matsubara Naoko, Françoise Gilot, Nancy Spero, Marisol Escobar, Bridget Riley, Carmen Herrera, Belkis Ayón, and Käthe Kollwitz. Exhibition hours are Monday – Friday 8 AM – 10 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 5 PM. Image Detail: Audrey Flack, Ecstasy of St. Theresa, 2013, Digital Print ans Serigraph on Paper

Rauch Business Center The Gallery at Rauch Business Center

Monday, May 20
9am

World War II was the largest and deadliest war in history. England alone was home to almost 30 military airfields. What was it like growing up in an England that was covered in airbases and focused solely on the war effort? Dame Elisabeth Frink (1930-1993) was not quite nine years old when the War shattered the calm of her English countryside home. Raised near an airbase in Suffolk, she experienced horses and birds of prey side-by-side with crashing airplanes and machine gun fire. These birds of prey would feature prominently in the prints she created throughout her career. According to Frink she “used birds as a vehicle for all sorts of aggressive forms… They became likes bits of shrapnel and flight things, you know, with very sharp beaks”. The prints featured in the exhibition Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures, represent a period in Frink’s work, starting in the mid-1960s, when her tone began to shift away from the chaos of her earlier work - work that was born out of the War’s immediate impact on her - to focus on her deepening concern for the relationship between human beings and the natural world. Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Elisabeth Frink, Peregrine Falcon, from the series Birds of Prey, 1974, etching, aquatint, and lithograph on paper.

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Monday, May 20
9am

“They always say that the photographer is a hunter of images. Really, we are fishermen with hooks and lines.”—Robert Doisneau Considered one of France’s great 20th century photographers, Robert Doisneau (1922-1994) created an archive of 450,000 original negatives by the time of his death. Alongside other noteworthies like Brassaï and Édouard Boubat, Doisneau illuminated the humanity of Parisians struggling to resume everyday life in the aftermath of World War II. Although he began taking pictures at the age of sixteen, Doisneau’s natural shyness led him to prefer shooting objects instead of people. Eventually, he would turn this to his advantage, using the invisibility of the photographer to uncover the poetry of the streets, which would become his lifelong subject. Through surreal and humorous juxtapositions, Doisneau revealed the warmth of city life all around him. As World War II threw Paris into disarray, Doisneau was drafted into the Resistance as a soldier and a photographer, capturing the occupation and liberation of Paris. Perhaps his most famous picture, Le Baiser de l’Hôtel de Ville (The Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville), 1950—included in the current exhibition—distilled the romance of the city in the post-war era. His freelance photography appeared in the pages of Life and Vogue, and his work continues to be shown and celebrated today internationally. Robert Doisneau: Paris After The War continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 4th floor. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Robert Doisneau, Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville, 1950, gelatin silver prints

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Tuesday, May 21
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Tuesday, May 21
12am

NavigateLU is a new program through the Office of First-Year Experience that is replacing the evoLUtion Seminar. These individual meetings with students will aid them to set academic and personal goals, consider resources for success, and encourage thoughtful reflection. More information and applications can be found at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff.

Tuesday, May 21
12am

The Summer Reading Committee is excited to announce the 2019 selection, Carry On, by Lisa Fenn! Themes from the book that we are excited to discuss with first-year students will be around overcoming barriers, the cycle of poverty, family and community, active citizenship, and exploration of identity such as race, class, and disability. The Summer Reading discussion takes place during Orientation on Sunday, August 25. Faculty, staff, and graduate students are encouraged to sign up to be a discussion leader at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff. A free copy of the book will be provided to you along with support materials to aid the conversation.

Tuesday, May 21
12am

Parking Services will be closed from 12:00pm to 1:00pm beginning Friday, May 17, 2019 through Thursday August 15, 2019.

Tuesday, May 21
12am

Registration and Academic Services summer hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 8:15AM to 4:45 PM Thursday 9:30 AM to 4:45 PM Friday 8:15AM to 4:00PM, closed 12-1:00 PM

Tuesday, May 21
12am

The Center for Career & Professional Development is moving! That is right, we are packing up and moving to Maginnes Hall on the 5th floor. The physical move will take place May 20 - 24 and the center will be closed during this time. Stay tuned for more details and sneak peeks through our instagram: Lehighcareercenter

Tuesday, May 21
12am

The Office of Gender Violence Education and Support is currently recruiting new Advocates. The Gender Violence Support Advocates (Advocates) Program is a network of dedicated and compassionate staff and faculty volunteers who are trained to assist students who are impacted by sexual assault, intimate partner abuse, stalking, sexual exploitation, and sexual harassment. In their role, Advocates provide initial support and referrals to campus and community resources and reporting options and then help students navigate all their options. Serving as an Advocate requires, among other responsibilities, an initial 10 hour training, monthly meetings, being on-call, and attending campus gender violence prevention events. If you are interested in serving as an Advocate, please contact Dr. Brooke DeSipio, Director of the office of Gender Violence Education and Support at bed4@lehigh.edu to learn more about the position.

Tuesday, May 21
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Tuesday, May 21
10am

ERAC's annual Staff Development Day offers staff opportunities to enhance their skills, invest in personal as well as professional growth, re-establish relationships with co-workers, and, ignite new interest in projects and goals looking forward. Staff Development Day will provide the potential for better performance and satisfaction on the job. Join ERAC and your fellow colleagues for a variety of activites that engage staff in an active and creative intellectual setting. Re-connect with co-workers you haven't seen for a while, or better yet, network with a co-worker you haven't met yet. Free giveaways! Lunch is provided!

University Center 3rd floor

Tuesday, May 21
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Tuesday, May 21
4pm

Keynote Speaker: Seth Mattison | Workforce Trends Expert presentsThe War @ Work: The Hierarchy vs. The NetworkYou'll also have a chance to congratulate six 2019 Innovation Award Winners. Last year, more than 450 community leaders attended the iXchange, making it a premier regional business networking event. Click HERE for more information and to register.

Zoellner Arts Center Baker Hall

Tuesday, May 21
9am

Scale is relative. Large objects can loom over us and overwhelm. We shrink when confronted with a vast expanse, real or imaginary. Conversely, as our relative size grows larger, we surround, engulf, and contain smaller forms like a suitcase, a baby, or a grain of rice. Surprisingly, small spaces can also open portals to miniature worlds, while large forms can feel finite and contained.Artists take these effects seriously. Decisions about scale are often the first an artist makes when selecting the size of a canvas or a tool. The new exhibition Scale Shift: Large and Small Works features pairs of works with similar motifs that vary widely in scale. Visitors are invited to experience their own changing perception of relative size and imaginary space as they view these large and small works from the LUAG permanent collection. Scale Shift: Large and Small Works continues until May 24, 2019 in the Siegel Gallery, Iacocca Hall. Hours are Monday through Thursday 9 AM – 10 PM and Friday 9 AM – 5 PM. Image credit: Naoto Nakagawa, Silent Vision, 1974, Acrylic on canvas

Iacocca Hall Siegel Gallery

Tuesday, May 21
4pm

Research Talk by a faculty candidate for the College of Health

Alumni Memorial Building Admissions Theatre

Tuesday, May 21
1pm

Creating Value in Healthcare Through People, Processes, and Technology

Iacocca Hall Wood Dining Room

Tuesday, May 21
8am

A revolutionary. Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer (b. 1935), is a pioneer of the digital revolution in contemporary photography, one of the first photographers to manipulate his images digitally. Because of its mechanical nature, photography has often been misconstrued an unbiased reproduction of a single moment, a snapshot of the exact truth – something that Meyer actively disputes in his work. Meyer is renowned, not only for digital manipulation, but also for his powerful and provocative photographs that share his complex vision of reality. Meyer insists that all photographs – manipulated or not – are equally true and untrue. He argues that digital manipulation continues in the tradition of so-called “straight photography” in which unwanted details are cropped out, or the photographer asks his subject to step out of the shadows into better light. Seen this way, a photographer digitally editing a photograph is no different from a photographer offering stage directions from behind the camera. Both take liberties with the “truth” in service to the photographer’s vision. This exhibition showcases Meyer’s approach toward capturing the truth of a moment, complete with concrete reality of memories and emotions. Exhibition hours are Monday – Thursday 8AM – 10PM, Friday 8AM – 5PM, and Weekends: 10AM – 5PM. Image Detail: Pedro Meyer, Explosion of Green Chairs (Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, Mexico), 1991/1993/2008

E.W.F.M. Library / Mart Library / Computing Center

Tuesday, May 21
8am

In 1966, James Brown sang “It’s a man’s world!” Over the past year that statement has been shaken to its knees. Feminism, women’s rights, and women’s stories are front and center in the United States and across the world. The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have empowered women to continue speaking up about issues of sexual harassment and assault. A record number of women are running for political office, and – although much work remains to be done – women are and being celebrated in every field imaginable. In printmaking, The Future Is Female, but so is the past. With or without the visibility they deserve, women artists have engaged the art of printmaking from the beginning. Requiring technical mastery, physical strength, and stamina, printmaking—or the art of producing multiple images or impressions from a single plate or matrix—has its origins in 8th century Japan where designs were rubbed onto paper from wooden blocks. By the 15th century in Europe, the availability of inexpensive paper and the invention of the printing press led to a proliferation of printed images in a variety of techniques. The second half of the 20th century witnessed an explosion of interest in the creative potential of printmaking methods such as etching, engraving, lithography, woodcut, and silkscreen among others. Today, women artists continue to use these various techniques to tell their stories, exploring themes such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and/or economic class. This exhibition highlights contemporary women artists in the LUAG Teaching Museum permanent collection, including Faith Ringgold, Janet Fish, Maud Morgan, Matsubara Naoko, Françoise Gilot, Nancy Spero, Marisol Escobar, Bridget Riley, Carmen Herrera, Belkis Ayón, and Käthe Kollwitz. Exhibition hours are Monday – Friday 8 AM – 10 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 5 PM. Image Detail: Audrey Flack, Ecstasy of St. Theresa, 2013, Digital Print ans Serigraph on Paper

Rauch Business Center The Gallery at Rauch Business Center

Tuesday, May 21
9am

World War II was the largest and deadliest war in history. England alone was home to almost 30 military airfields. What was it like growing up in an England that was covered in airbases and focused solely on the war effort? Dame Elisabeth Frink (1930-1993) was not quite nine years old when the War shattered the calm of her English countryside home. Raised near an airbase in Suffolk, she experienced horses and birds of prey side-by-side with crashing airplanes and machine gun fire. These birds of prey would feature prominently in the prints she created throughout her career. According to Frink she “used birds as a vehicle for all sorts of aggressive forms… They became likes bits of shrapnel and flight things, you know, with very sharp beaks”. The prints featured in the exhibition Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures, represent a period in Frink’s work, starting in the mid-1960s, when her tone began to shift away from the chaos of her earlier work - work that was born out of the War’s immediate impact on her - to focus on her deepening concern for the relationship between human beings and the natural world. Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Elisabeth Frink, Peregrine Falcon, from the series Birds of Prey, 1974, etching, aquatint, and lithograph on paper.

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Tuesday, May 21
9am

“They always say that the photographer is a hunter of images. Really, we are fishermen with hooks and lines.”—Robert Doisneau Considered one of France’s great 20th century photographers, Robert Doisneau (1922-1994) created an archive of 450,000 original negatives by the time of his death. Alongside other noteworthies like Brassaï and Édouard Boubat, Doisneau illuminated the humanity of Parisians struggling to resume everyday life in the aftermath of World War II. Although he began taking pictures at the age of sixteen, Doisneau’s natural shyness led him to prefer shooting objects instead of people. Eventually, he would turn this to his advantage, using the invisibility of the photographer to uncover the poetry of the streets, which would become his lifelong subject. Through surreal and humorous juxtapositions, Doisneau revealed the warmth of city life all around him. As World War II threw Paris into disarray, Doisneau was drafted into the Resistance as a soldier and a photographer, capturing the occupation and liberation of Paris. Perhaps his most famous picture, Le Baiser de l’Hôtel de Ville (The Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville), 1950—included in the current exhibition—distilled the romance of the city in the post-war era. His freelance photography appeared in the pages of Life and Vogue, and his work continues to be shown and celebrated today internationally. Robert Doisneau: Paris After The War continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 4th floor. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Robert Doisneau, Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville, 1950, gelatin silver prints

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Tuesday, May 21
5pm

MINI NEW Evening Dance Class Session Evening Ballet and/or Jazz Dance Classes CHOOSE: MINI NEW Course: 4 evening classes (Finish an entire week before Final Exams.) FULL NEW Session: 8 evening classes These are low-cost classes open to everyone. E. Laura Hausmann, from New York City, teaches all classes. Makeup classes are available for missed classes. Participants are ages 10-78+ and include students, faculty, staff, family, and members of the community. By design, different levels are available from "never danced" through experienced. These classes are taught with sensitivity to anatomy, kinesiology, health, physical potential, community, and enjoyment of dance. Tuesday evening choices are: Beginning Ballet (5:35-6:50) Beginning Jazz Dance (6:50-8:05) Ballet II (8:05-9:20) Jazz Dance-Open Level (9:20-10:35) Ballet Program (5:35-6:50 and 8:05-9:20) Intensive Program (5:35-10:35) Contact the instructor directly at ELH304@lehigh.edu to have individual questions answered or to register for classes.

Taylor Gym 4th Floor Dance Studio

Wednesday, May 22
12am

NavigateLU is a new program through the Office of First-Year Experience that is replacing the evoLUtion Seminar. These individual meetings with students will aid them to set academic and personal goals, consider resources for success, and encourage thoughtful reflection. More information and applications can be found at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff.

Wednesday, May 22
12am

The Summer Reading Committee is excited to announce the 2019 selection, Carry On, by Lisa Fenn! Themes from the book that we are excited to discuss with first-year students will be around overcoming barriers, the cycle of poverty, family and community, active citizenship, and exploration of identity such as race, class, and disability. The Summer Reading discussion takes place during Orientation on Sunday, August 25. Faculty, staff, and graduate students are encouraged to sign up to be a discussion leader at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff. A free copy of the book will be provided to you along with support materials to aid the conversation.

Wednesday, May 22
12am

The Center for Career & Professional Development is moving! That is right, we are packing up and moving to Maginnes Hall on the 5th floor. The physical move will take place May 20 - 24 and the center will be closed during this time. Stay tuned for more details and sneak peeks through our instagram: Lehighcareercenter

Wednesday, May 22
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Wednesday, May 22
12am

Parking Services will be closed on Thursday, May 23, 2019, from 10:30 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. for a department meeting. The office will re-open at 1:00 P.M.

Wednesday, May 22
12am

The goal of the conference is to bring together people who develop data science algorithms and those who heavily use such algorithms with the broad application focus of molecular and materials science (anything from atoms to bulk materials). We have a (still growing) list of twenty speakers from diverse fields such as computer science, applied mathematics, chemistry, chemical engineering, materials science, biology, and bioengineering. This conference is being facilitated by the newly formed I-DISC institute and is being supported by an NSF TRIPODS+X grant. Organizing Committee: Srinivas Rangarajan, Jeetain Mittal, Joshua Agar of Lehigh and Payel Das of IBM Research AI, TJ Watson Research Center Registration - mandatory. Deadline: May 8, 2019 This event is free to all Lehigh faculty, postdocs, and students. More information and to register: go.lehigh.edu/DataScienceConference

Iacocca Hall Wood Dining Room

Wednesday, May 22
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Wednesday, May 22
9am

1 Million Cups is an event that brings together the Lehigh Valley entrepreneurial community over coffee and conversation.

Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Wednesday, May 22
11am

Enjoy fresh grilled-to-order lunch with a live accoustic performance by Tim Harakal at the Common Grounds Patio! Grill Open - 11:00am - 1:30pm Live Music - 11:30am - 1:00pm

Rauch Business Center Common Grounds Patio

Wednesday, May 22
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Wednesday, May 22
9am

Scale is relative. Large objects can loom over us and overwhelm. We shrink when confronted with a vast expanse, real or imaginary. Conversely, as our relative size grows larger, we surround, engulf, and contain smaller forms like a suitcase, a baby, or a grain of rice. Surprisingly, small spaces can also open portals to miniature worlds, while large forms can feel finite and contained.Artists take these effects seriously. Decisions about scale are often the first an artist makes when selecting the size of a canvas or a tool. The new exhibition Scale Shift: Large and Small Works features pairs of works with similar motifs that vary widely in scale. Visitors are invited to experience their own changing perception of relative size and imaginary space as they view these large and small works from the LUAG permanent collection. Scale Shift: Large and Small Works continues until May 24, 2019 in the Siegel Gallery, Iacocca Hall. Hours are Monday through Thursday 9 AM – 10 PM and Friday 9 AM – 5 PM. Image credit: Naoto Nakagawa, Silent Vision, 1974, Acrylic on canvas

Iacocca Hall Siegel Gallery

Wednesday, May 22
11am

The founders of Lehigh University saw art as integral to a well-rounded education. Following in the footsteps of Thomas Jefferson, who made his personal art collection accessible to students and faculty at the University of Virginia, Lehigh University’s first president, Henry Coppée, declared art one of the “elementary branches” of education. Art has been part of the university since its beginning in 1865. By 1926 the university was actively collecting and exhibiting works of art, and in 1935 the first gallery facilities were established to house the permanent collection. From these humble beginnings the Lehigh University Art Galleries · Teaching Museum was formed. Today, the permanent collection numbers over 15,000 works of art, spanning many cultures and centuries. Although the collection has evolved and grown, the mission has stayed the same, to inspire, develop, and promote visual literacy and cultural understanding, providing educational opportunities across all areas of study. This extensive exhibition, on view throughout two galleries, features highlights from the university’s world-class collection, including works by Pierre Bonnard, Margaret Bourke-White, Albrecht Dürer, Wifredo Lam, Charles Burchfield, Jasper Johns, Diane Arbus, Jacob Lawrence, Robert Mapplethorpe, Henri Matisse, and many more. Exhibition hours are Wednesday through Saturday 11 AM – 5 PM and Sunday 1 PM – 5 PM. The Main and Lower Galleries are CLOSED Mondays and Tuesdays. Image Detail: Marsden Hartley, Fruit in Basket, 1922, oil on canvas

Zoellner Arts Center Main Gallery

Wednesday, May 22
8am

A revolutionary. Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer (b. 1935), is a pioneer of the digital revolution in contemporary photography, one of the first photographers to manipulate his images digitally. Because of its mechanical nature, photography has often been misconstrued an unbiased reproduction of a single moment, a snapshot of the exact truth – something that Meyer actively disputes in his work. Meyer is renowned, not only for digital manipulation, but also for his powerful and provocative photographs that share his complex vision of reality. Meyer insists that all photographs – manipulated or not – are equally true and untrue. He argues that digital manipulation continues in the tradition of so-called “straight photography” in which unwanted details are cropped out, or the photographer asks his subject to step out of the shadows into better light. Seen this way, a photographer digitally editing a photograph is no different from a photographer offering stage directions from behind the camera. Both take liberties with the “truth” in service to the photographer’s vision. This exhibition showcases Meyer’s approach toward capturing the truth of a moment, complete with concrete reality of memories and emotions. Exhibition hours are Monday – Thursday 8AM – 10PM, Friday 8AM – 5PM, and Weekends: 10AM – 5PM. Image Detail: Pedro Meyer, Explosion of Green Chairs (Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, Mexico), 1991/1993/2008

E.W.F.M. Library / Mart Library / Computing Center

Wednesday, May 22
8am

In 1966, James Brown sang “It’s a man’s world!” Over the past year that statement has been shaken to its knees. Feminism, women’s rights, and women’s stories are front and center in the United States and across the world. The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have empowered women to continue speaking up about issues of sexual harassment and assault. A record number of women are running for political office, and – although much work remains to be done – women are and being celebrated in every field imaginable. In printmaking, The Future Is Female, but so is the past. With or without the visibility they deserve, women artists have engaged the art of printmaking from the beginning. Requiring technical mastery, physical strength, and stamina, printmaking—or the art of producing multiple images or impressions from a single plate or matrix—has its origins in 8th century Japan where designs were rubbed onto paper from wooden blocks. By the 15th century in Europe, the availability of inexpensive paper and the invention of the printing press led to a proliferation of printed images in a variety of techniques. The second half of the 20th century witnessed an explosion of interest in the creative potential of printmaking methods such as etching, engraving, lithography, woodcut, and silkscreen among others. Today, women artists continue to use these various techniques to tell their stories, exploring themes such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and/or economic class. This exhibition highlights contemporary women artists in the LUAG Teaching Museum permanent collection, including Faith Ringgold, Janet Fish, Maud Morgan, Matsubara Naoko, Françoise Gilot, Nancy Spero, Marisol Escobar, Bridget Riley, Carmen Herrera, Belkis Ayón, and Käthe Kollwitz. Exhibition hours are Monday – Friday 8 AM – 10 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 5 PM. Image Detail: Audrey Flack, Ecstasy of St. Theresa, 2013, Digital Print ans Serigraph on Paper

Rauch Business Center The Gallery at Rauch Business Center

Wednesday, May 22
9am

World War II was the largest and deadliest war in history. England alone was home to almost 30 military airfields. What was it like growing up in an England that was covered in airbases and focused solely on the war effort? Dame Elisabeth Frink (1930-1993) was not quite nine years old when the War shattered the calm of her English countryside home. Raised near an airbase in Suffolk, she experienced horses and birds of prey side-by-side with crashing airplanes and machine gun fire. These birds of prey would feature prominently in the prints she created throughout her career. According to Frink she “used birds as a vehicle for all sorts of aggressive forms… They became likes bits of shrapnel and flight things, you know, with very sharp beaks”. The prints featured in the exhibition Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures, represent a period in Frink’s work, starting in the mid-1960s, when her tone began to shift away from the chaos of her earlier work - work that was born out of the War’s immediate impact on her - to focus on her deepening concern for the relationship between human beings and the natural world. Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Elisabeth Frink, Peregrine Falcon, from the series Birds of Prey, 1974, etching, aquatint, and lithograph on paper.

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Wednesday, May 22
9am

“They always say that the photographer is a hunter of images. Really, we are fishermen with hooks and lines.”—Robert Doisneau Considered one of France’s great 20th century photographers, Robert Doisneau (1922-1994) created an archive of 450,000 original negatives by the time of his death. Alongside other noteworthies like Brassaï and Édouard Boubat, Doisneau illuminated the humanity of Parisians struggling to resume everyday life in the aftermath of World War II. Although he began taking pictures at the age of sixteen, Doisneau’s natural shyness led him to prefer shooting objects instead of people. Eventually, he would turn this to his advantage, using the invisibility of the photographer to uncover the poetry of the streets, which would become his lifelong subject. Through surreal and humorous juxtapositions, Doisneau revealed the warmth of city life all around him. As World War II threw Paris into disarray, Doisneau was drafted into the Resistance as a soldier and a photographer, capturing the occupation and liberation of Paris. Perhaps his most famous picture, Le Baiser de l’Hôtel de Ville (The Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville), 1950—included in the current exhibition—distilled the romance of the city in the post-war era. His freelance photography appeared in the pages of Life and Vogue, and his work continues to be shown and celebrated today internationally. Robert Doisneau: Paris After The War continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 4th floor. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Robert Doisneau, Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville, 1950, gelatin silver prints

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Thursday, May 23
12am

Lehigh University Men's Track and Field vs NCAA East Prelims TV: FloTrack Streaming Video: https://www.flotrack.org/live/12511-2019-di-ncaa-east-preliminary-round/signup?utm_campaign=44627incaaeastpreli&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=email&utm_content=email&rtid=44627&coverage_id=6395409 https://lehighsports.com/calendar.aspx?id=11637

Thursday, May 23
12am

Lehigh University Women's Track and Field vs NCAA East Prelims TV: FloTrack Streaming Video: https://www.flotrack.org/live/12511-2019-di-ncaa-east-preliminary-round/signup?utm_campaign=44627incaaeastpreli&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=email&utm_content=email&rtid=44627&coverage_id=6395409 https://lehighsports.com/calendar.aspx?id=11638

Thursday, May 23
12am

The Center for Career & Professional Development is moving! That is right, we are packing up and moving to Maginnes Hall on the 5th floor. The physical move will take place May 20 - 24 and the center will be closed during this time. Stay tuned for more details and sneak peeks through our instagram: Lehighcareercenter

Thursday, May 23
12am

The goal of the conference is to bring together people who develop data science algorithms and those who heavily use such algorithms with the broad application focus of molecular and materials science (anything from atoms to bulk materials). We have a (still growing) list of twenty speakers from diverse fields such as computer science, applied mathematics, chemistry, chemical engineering, materials science, biology, and bioengineering. This conference is being facilitated by the newly formed I-DISC institute and is being supported by an NSF TRIPODS+X grant. Organizing Committee: Srinivas Rangarajan, Jeetain Mittal, Joshua Agar of Lehigh and Payel Das of IBM Research AI, TJ Watson Research Center Registration - mandatory. Deadline: May 8, 2019 This event is free to all Lehigh faculty, postdocs, and students. More information and to register: go.lehigh.edu/DataScienceConference

Iacocca Hall Wood Dining Room

Thursday, May 23
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Thursday, May 23
12am

NavigateLU is a new program through the Office of First-Year Experience that is replacing the evoLUtion Seminar. These individual meetings with students will aid them to set academic and personal goals, consider resources for success, and encourage thoughtful reflection. More information and applications can be found at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff.

Thursday, May 23
12am

The Summer Reading Committee is excited to announce the 2019 selection, Carry On, by Lisa Fenn! Themes from the book that we are excited to discuss with first-year students will be around overcoming barriers, the cycle of poverty, family and community, active citizenship, and exploration of identity such as race, class, and disability. The Summer Reading discussion takes place during Orientation on Sunday, August 25. Faculty, staff, and graduate students are encouraged to sign up to be a discussion leader at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff. A free copy of the book will be provided to you along with support materials to aid the conversation.

Thursday, May 23
12am

Parking Services will be closed on Thursday, May 23, 2019, from 10:30 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. for a department meeting. The office will re-open at 1:00 P.M.

Thursday, May 23
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Thursday, May 23
9am

Each staff member at Lehigh plays a role in the maintenance and enhancement of a diverse and inclusive work environment and community. Inclusion Insights will show you how to use creativity and innovation (one of Lehigh’s Success Factors) to contribute to our Equitable Community by seeking different perspectives, new ideas, knowledge and experiences. This program incorporates the diversity expertise of Dr. Steve Robbins, gifted speaker and story teller. Presented by Human Resources. Registration open to Staff and Faculty only. Registration is required. Click here and select a time slot to register. If the session is full, please click the "Join wait list" button to be placed on the waiting list.

Thursday, May 23
10am

Fresh produce/local vendors, right on campus! Come to the Bethlehem Farmers' Market every Thursday, May 2 - Oct 31, 10 am - 2 pm, in Farrington Square. Come stock up on fresh produce AND support this community service.

Farrington Square Courtyard

Thursday, May 23
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Thursday, May 23
9am

Scale is relative. Large objects can loom over us and overwhelm. We shrink when confronted with a vast expanse, real or imaginary. Conversely, as our relative size grows larger, we surround, engulf, and contain smaller forms like a suitcase, a baby, or a grain of rice. Surprisingly, small spaces can also open portals to miniature worlds, while large forms can feel finite and contained.Artists take these effects seriously. Decisions about scale are often the first an artist makes when selecting the size of a canvas or a tool. The new exhibition Scale Shift: Large and Small Works features pairs of works with similar motifs that vary widely in scale. Visitors are invited to experience their own changing perception of relative size and imaginary space as they view these large and small works from the LUAG permanent collection. Scale Shift: Large and Small Works continues until May 24, 2019 in the Siegel Gallery, Iacocca Hall. Hours are Monday through Thursday 9 AM – 10 PM and Friday 9 AM – 5 PM. Image credit: Naoto Nakagawa, Silent Vision, 1974, Acrylic on canvas

Iacocca Hall Siegel Gallery

Thursday, May 23
11am

The founders of Lehigh University saw art as integral to a well-rounded education. Following in the footsteps of Thomas Jefferson, who made his personal art collection accessible to students and faculty at the University of Virginia, Lehigh University’s first president, Henry Coppée, declared art one of the “elementary branches” of education. Art has been part of the university since its beginning in 1865. By 1926 the university was actively collecting and exhibiting works of art, and in 1935 the first gallery facilities were established to house the permanent collection. From these humble beginnings the Lehigh University Art Galleries · Teaching Museum was formed. Today, the permanent collection numbers over 15,000 works of art, spanning many cultures and centuries. Although the collection has evolved and grown, the mission has stayed the same, to inspire, develop, and promote visual literacy and cultural understanding, providing educational opportunities across all areas of study. This extensive exhibition, on view throughout two galleries, features highlights from the university’s world-class collection, including works by Pierre Bonnard, Margaret Bourke-White, Albrecht Dürer, Wifredo Lam, Charles Burchfield, Jasper Johns, Diane Arbus, Jacob Lawrence, Robert Mapplethorpe, Henri Matisse, and many more. Exhibition hours are Wednesday through Saturday 11 AM – 5 PM and Sunday 1 PM – 5 PM. The Main and Lower Galleries are CLOSED Mondays and Tuesdays. Image Detail: Marsden Hartley, Fruit in Basket, 1922, oil on canvas

Zoellner Arts Center Main Gallery

Thursday, May 23
8am

A revolutionary. Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer (b. 1935), is a pioneer of the digital revolution in contemporary photography, one of the first photographers to manipulate his images digitally. Because of its mechanical nature, photography has often been misconstrued an unbiased reproduction of a single moment, a snapshot of the exact truth – something that Meyer actively disputes in his work. Meyer is renowned, not only for digital manipulation, but also for his powerful and provocative photographs that share his complex vision of reality. Meyer insists that all photographs – manipulated or not – are equally true and untrue. He argues that digital manipulation continues in the tradition of so-called “straight photography” in which unwanted details are cropped out, or the photographer asks his subject to step out of the shadows into better light. Seen this way, a photographer digitally editing a photograph is no different from a photographer offering stage directions from behind the camera. Both take liberties with the “truth” in service to the photographer’s vision. This exhibition showcases Meyer’s approach toward capturing the truth of a moment, complete with concrete reality of memories and emotions. Exhibition hours are Monday – Thursday 8AM – 10PM, Friday 8AM – 5PM, and Weekends: 10AM – 5PM. Image Detail: Pedro Meyer, Explosion of Green Chairs (Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, Mexico), 1991/1993/2008

E.W.F.M. Library / Mart Library / Computing Center

Thursday, May 23
8am

In 1966, James Brown sang “It’s a man’s world!” Over the past year that statement has been shaken to its knees. Feminism, women’s rights, and women’s stories are front and center in the United States and across the world. The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have empowered women to continue speaking up about issues of sexual harassment and assault. A record number of women are running for political office, and – although much work remains to be done – women are and being celebrated in every field imaginable. In printmaking, The Future Is Female, but so is the past. With or without the visibility they deserve, women artists have engaged the art of printmaking from the beginning. Requiring technical mastery, physical strength, and stamina, printmaking—or the art of producing multiple images or impressions from a single plate or matrix—has its origins in 8th century Japan where designs were rubbed onto paper from wooden blocks. By the 15th century in Europe, the availability of inexpensive paper and the invention of the printing press led to a proliferation of printed images in a variety of techniques. The second half of the 20th century witnessed an explosion of interest in the creative potential of printmaking methods such as etching, engraving, lithography, woodcut, and silkscreen among others. Today, women artists continue to use these various techniques to tell their stories, exploring themes such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and/or economic class. This exhibition highlights contemporary women artists in the LUAG Teaching Museum permanent collection, including Faith Ringgold, Janet Fish, Maud Morgan, Matsubara Naoko, Françoise Gilot, Nancy Spero, Marisol Escobar, Bridget Riley, Carmen Herrera, Belkis Ayón, and Käthe Kollwitz. Exhibition hours are Monday – Friday 8 AM – 10 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 5 PM. Image Detail: Audrey Flack, Ecstasy of St. Theresa, 2013, Digital Print ans Serigraph on Paper

Rauch Business Center The Gallery at Rauch Business Center

Thursday, May 23
9am

World War II was the largest and deadliest war in history. England alone was home to almost 30 military airfields. What was it like growing up in an England that was covered in airbases and focused solely on the war effort? Dame Elisabeth Frink (1930-1993) was not quite nine years old when the War shattered the calm of her English countryside home. Raised near an airbase in Suffolk, she experienced horses and birds of prey side-by-side with crashing airplanes and machine gun fire. These birds of prey would feature prominently in the prints she created throughout her career. According to Frink she “used birds as a vehicle for all sorts of aggressive forms… They became likes bits of shrapnel and flight things, you know, with very sharp beaks”. The prints featured in the exhibition Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures, represent a period in Frink’s work, starting in the mid-1960s, when her tone began to shift away from the chaos of her earlier work - work that was born out of the War’s immediate impact on her - to focus on her deepening concern for the relationship between human beings and the natural world. Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Elisabeth Frink, Peregrine Falcon, from the series Birds of Prey, 1974, etching, aquatint, and lithograph on paper.

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Thursday, May 23
9am

“They always say that the photographer is a hunter of images. Really, we are fishermen with hooks and lines.”—Robert Doisneau Considered one of France’s great 20th century photographers, Robert Doisneau (1922-1994) created an archive of 450,000 original negatives by the time of his death. Alongside other noteworthies like Brassaï and Édouard Boubat, Doisneau illuminated the humanity of Parisians struggling to resume everyday life in the aftermath of World War II. Although he began taking pictures at the age of sixteen, Doisneau’s natural shyness led him to prefer shooting objects instead of people. Eventually, he would turn this to his advantage, using the invisibility of the photographer to uncover the poetry of the streets, which would become his lifelong subject. Through surreal and humorous juxtapositions, Doisneau revealed the warmth of city life all around him. As World War II threw Paris into disarray, Doisneau was drafted into the Resistance as a soldier and a photographer, capturing the occupation and liberation of Paris. Perhaps his most famous picture, Le Baiser de l’Hôtel de Ville (The Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville), 1950—included in the current exhibition—distilled the romance of the city in the post-war era. His freelance photography appeared in the pages of Life and Vogue, and his work continues to be shown and celebrated today internationally. Robert Doisneau: Paris After The War continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 4th floor. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Robert Doisneau, Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville, 1950, gelatin silver prints

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Friday, May 24
12am

The Summer Reading Committee is excited to announce the 2019 selection, Carry On, by Lisa Fenn! Themes from the book that we are excited to discuss with first-year students will be around overcoming barriers, the cycle of poverty, family and community, active citizenship, and exploration of identity such as race, class, and disability. The Summer Reading discussion takes place during Orientation on Sunday, August 25. Faculty, staff, and graduate students are encouraged to sign up to be a discussion leader at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff. A free copy of the book will be provided to you along with support materials to aid the conversation.

Friday, May 24
12am

The Center for Career & Professional Development is moving! That is right, we are packing up and moving to Maginnes Hall on the 5th floor. The physical move will take place May 20 - 24 and the center will be closed during this time. Stay tuned for more details and sneak peeks through our instagram: Lehighcareercenter

Friday, May 24
12am

The goal of the conference is to bring together people who develop data science algorithms and those who heavily use such algorithms with the broad application focus of molecular and materials science (anything from atoms to bulk materials). We have a (still growing) list of twenty speakers from diverse fields such as computer science, applied mathematics, chemistry, chemical engineering, materials science, biology, and bioengineering. This conference is being facilitated by the newly formed I-DISC institute and is being supported by an NSF TRIPODS+X grant. Organizing Committee: Srinivas Rangarajan, Jeetain Mittal, Joshua Agar of Lehigh and Payel Das of IBM Research AI, TJ Watson Research Center Registration - mandatory. Deadline: May 8, 2019 This event is free to all Lehigh faculty, postdocs, and students. More information and to register: go.lehigh.edu/DataScienceConference

Iacocca Hall Wood Dining Room

Friday, May 24
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Friday, May 24
12am

NavigateLU is a new program through the Office of First-Year Experience that is replacing the evoLUtion Seminar. These individual meetings with students will aid them to set academic and personal goals, consider resources for success, and encourage thoughtful reflection. More information and applications can be found at go.lehigh.edu/ofyefacstaff.

Friday, May 24
12am

Summer is here and we've got a great lineup of flavors and fun! Pandini's, Common Grounds, Iacocca Cafe and Brodhead will be open all summer. Enjoy $1 Iced Coffee at Pandini's and Common Grounds every Monday and our Grill & Chill Series at the Common Grounds Patio every Wednesday featuring live entertainment. Please check our website for a complete listing of our summer hours of operation: https://lehigh.sodexomyway.com/dining-near-me/open-now

Friday, May 24
12am

Lehigh University Men's Track and Field vs NCAA East Prelims TV: FloTrack Streaming Video: https://www.flotrack.org/live/12511-2019-di-ncaa-east-preliminary-round/signup?utm_campaign=44627incaaeastpreli&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=email&utm_content=email&rtid=44627&coverage_id=6395409 https://lehighsports.com/calendar.aspx?id=11637

Friday, May 24
12am

Lehigh University Women's Track and Field vs NCAA East Prelims TV: FloTrack Streaming Video: https://www.flotrack.org/live/12511-2019-di-ncaa-east-preliminary-round/signup?utm_campaign=44627incaaeastpreli&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=email&utm_content=email&rtid=44627&coverage_id=6395409 https://lehighsports.com/calendar.aspx?id=11638

Friday, May 24
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Friday, May 24
11am

The Women of Color Network strives to create intentional and meaningful community among women of color; provide feedback and advice on professional matters regarding being a women of color in higher education; learn about, analyze, and discuss topics, issues, and current events facing the community of women of color in higher education.

University Center 204

Friday, May 24
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Friday, May 24
8am

A revolutionary. Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer (b. 1935), is a pioneer of the digital revolution in contemporary photography, one of the first photographers to manipulate his images digitally. Because of its mechanical nature, photography has often been misconstrued an unbiased reproduction of a single moment, a snapshot of the exact truth – something that Meyer actively disputes in his work. Meyer is renowned, not only for digital manipulation, but also for his powerful and provocative photographs that share his complex vision of reality. Meyer insists that all photographs – manipulated or not – are equally true and untrue. He argues that digital manipulation continues in the tradition of so-called “straight photography” in which unwanted details are cropped out, or the photographer asks his subject to step out of the shadows into better light. Seen this way, a photographer digitally editing a photograph is no different from a photographer offering stage directions from behind the camera. Both take liberties with the “truth” in service to the photographer’s vision. This exhibition showcases Meyer’s approach toward capturing the truth of a moment, complete with concrete reality of memories and emotions. Exhibition hours are Monday – Thursday 8AM – 10PM, Friday 8AM – 5PM, and Weekends: 10AM – 5PM. Image Detail: Pedro Meyer, Explosion of Green Chairs (Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca, Mexico), 1991/1993/2008

E.W.F.M. Library / Mart Library / Computing Center

Friday, May 24
9am

Scale is relative. Large objects can loom over us and overwhelm. We shrink when confronted with a vast expanse, real or imaginary. Conversely, as our relative size grows larger, we surround, engulf, and contain smaller forms like a suitcase, a baby, or a grain of rice. Surprisingly, small spaces can also open portals to miniature worlds, while large forms can feel finite and contained.Artists take these effects seriously. Decisions about scale are often the first an artist makes when selecting the size of a canvas or a tool. The new exhibition Scale Shift: Large and Small Works features pairs of works with similar motifs that vary widely in scale. Visitors are invited to experience their own changing perception of relative size and imaginary space as they view these large and small works from the LUAG permanent collection. Scale Shift: Large and Small Works continues until May 24, 2019 in the Siegel Gallery, Iacocca Hall. Hours are Monday through Thursday 9 AM – 10 PM and Friday 9 AM – 5 PM. Image credit: Naoto Nakagawa, Silent Vision, 1974, Acrylic on canvas

Iacocca Hall Siegel Gallery

Friday, May 24
11am

The founders of Lehigh University saw art as integral to a well-rounded education. Following in the footsteps of Thomas Jefferson, who made his personal art collection accessible to students and faculty at the University of Virginia, Lehigh University’s first president, Henry Coppée, declared art one of the “elementary branches” of education. Art has been part of the university since its beginning in 1865. By 1926 the university was actively collecting and exhibiting works of art, and in 1935 the first gallery facilities were established to house the permanent collection. From these humble beginnings the Lehigh University Art Galleries · Teaching Museum was formed. Today, the permanent collection numbers over 15,000 works of art, spanning many cultures and centuries. Although the collection has evolved and grown, the mission has stayed the same, to inspire, develop, and promote visual literacy and cultural understanding, providing educational opportunities across all areas of study. This extensive exhibition, on view throughout two galleries, features highlights from the university’s world-class collection, including works by Pierre Bonnard, Margaret Bourke-White, Albrecht Dürer, Wifredo Lam, Charles Burchfield, Jasper Johns, Diane Arbus, Jacob Lawrence, Robert Mapplethorpe, Henri Matisse, and many more. Exhibition hours are Wednesday through Saturday 11 AM – 5 PM and Sunday 1 PM – 5 PM. The Main and Lower Galleries are CLOSED Mondays and Tuesdays. Image Detail: Marsden Hartley, Fruit in Basket, 1922, oil on canvas

Zoellner Arts Center Main Gallery

Friday, May 24
8am

In 1966, James Brown sang “It’s a man’s world!” Over the past year that statement has been shaken to its knees. Feminism, women’s rights, and women’s stories are front and center in the United States and across the world. The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have empowered women to continue speaking up about issues of sexual harassment and assault. A record number of women are running for political office, and – although much work remains to be done – women are and being celebrated in every field imaginable. In printmaking, The Future Is Female, but so is the past. With or without the visibility they deserve, women artists have engaged the art of printmaking from the beginning. Requiring technical mastery, physical strength, and stamina, printmaking—or the art of producing multiple images or impressions from a single plate or matrix—has its origins in 8th century Japan where designs were rubbed onto paper from wooden blocks. By the 15th century in Europe, the availability of inexpensive paper and the invention of the printing press led to a proliferation of printed images in a variety of techniques. The second half of the 20th century witnessed an explosion of interest in the creative potential of printmaking methods such as etching, engraving, lithography, woodcut, and silkscreen among others. Today, women artists continue to use these various techniques to tell their stories, exploring themes such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and/or economic class. This exhibition highlights contemporary women artists in the LUAG Teaching Museum permanent collection, including Faith Ringgold, Janet Fish, Maud Morgan, Matsubara Naoko, Françoise Gilot, Nancy Spero, Marisol Escobar, Bridget Riley, Carmen Herrera, Belkis Ayón, and Käthe Kollwitz. Exhibition hours are Monday – Friday 8 AM – 10 PM and Saturday 8 AM – 5 PM. Image Detail: Audrey Flack, Ecstasy of St. Theresa, 2013, Digital Print ans Serigraph on Paper

Rauch Business Center The Gallery at Rauch Business Center

Friday, May 24
9am

World War II was the largest and deadliest war in history. England alone was home to almost 30 military airfields. What was it like growing up in an England that was covered in airbases and focused solely on the war effort? Dame Elisabeth Frink (1930-1993) was not quite nine years old when the War shattered the calm of her English countryside home. Raised near an airbase in Suffolk, she experienced horses and birds of prey side-by-side with crashing airplanes and machine gun fire. These birds of prey would feature prominently in the prints she created throughout her career. According to Frink she “used birds as a vehicle for all sorts of aggressive forms… They became likes bits of shrapnel and flight things, you know, with very sharp beaks”. The prints featured in the exhibition Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures, represent a period in Frink’s work, starting in the mid-1960s, when her tone began to shift away from the chaos of her earlier work - work that was born out of the War’s immediate impact on her - to focus on her deepening concern for the relationship between human beings and the natural world. Elisabeth Frink: Mountain Hawks & Other Creatures continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 2nd and 3rd floors. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Elisabeth Frink, Peregrine Falcon, from the series Birds of Prey, 1974, etching, aquatint, and lithograph on paper.

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Friday, May 24
9am

“They always say that the photographer is a hunter of images. Really, we are fishermen with hooks and lines.”—Robert Doisneau Considered one of France’s great 20th century photographers, Robert Doisneau (1922-1994) created an archive of 450,000 original negatives by the time of his death. Alongside other noteworthies like Brassaï and Édouard Boubat, Doisneau illuminated the humanity of Parisians struggling to resume everyday life in the aftermath of World War II. Although he began taking pictures at the age of sixteen, Doisneau’s natural shyness led him to prefer shooting objects instead of people. Eventually, he would turn this to his advantage, using the invisibility of the photographer to uncover the poetry of the streets, which would become his lifelong subject. Through surreal and humorous juxtapositions, Doisneau revealed the warmth of city life all around him. As World War II threw Paris into disarray, Doisneau was drafted into the Resistance as a soldier and a photographer, capturing the occupation and liberation of Paris. Perhaps his most famous picture, Le Baiser de l’Hôtel de Ville (The Kiss by the Hôtel de Ville), 1950—included in the current exhibition—distilled the romance of the city in the post-war era. His freelance photography appeared in the pages of Life and Vogue, and his work continues to be shown and celebrated today internationally. Robert Doisneau: Paris After The War continues until May 24, 2019 in the Dubois Gallery, Maginnes Hall on the 4th floor. Hours are Monday through Friday 9 AM – 10 PM. Image credit: Robert Doisneau, Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville, 1950, gelatin silver prints

Maginnes Hall Dubois Gallery

Saturday, May 25
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Saturday, May 25
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Saturday, May 25
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Sunday, May 26
12am

2019 marks the 300th anniversary of the publication of Daniel Defoe’s groundbreaking novel, Robinson Crusoe. Through the display of early editions of Robinson Crusoe, other writings by Daniel Defoe, and works on natural history, navigation, and other sources from the 18th century, this exhibit looks at the world of this well-known novel. Often abridged for a juvenile audience, the central themes and conflicts of Defoe’s timeless novel (mutiny, castaways, and survival) have been revisited by countless authors in a multitude of formats.

Linderman Library Regular building hours in Grand Reading Room, Bayer Galleria, Cafe Gallery

Sunday, May 26
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/temporary-housing

Sunday, May 26
9am

financeadmin.lehigh.edu/content/summer-housing

Monday, May 27
12am

Summer is here and we've got a great lineup of flavors and fun! Pandini's, Common Grounds, Iacocca Cafe and Brodhead will be open all summer. Enjoy $1 Iced Coffee at Pandini's and Common Grounds every Monday and our Grill & Chill Series at the Common Grounds Patio every Wednesday featuring live entertainment. Please check our website for a complete listing of our summer hours of operation: https://lehigh.sodexomyway.com/dining-near-me/open-now

Tuesday, May 28
12am

The Fiscal Year-End 2018-19 Close Calendar (Adobe.pdf or Google calendar) includes important deadlines for June & July 2019 – click the link for the Controller’s Office website & check the NEW Items section - https://financeadmin.lehigh.edu/controller Items must be received in the offices indicated by the Last day noted belowDates for this week :JUNE Mon 3 Last day - To submit reallocations to clear future support indexes (2399XX indexes) to Payroll.

Tuesday, May 28
12am

The Office of Gender Violence Education and Support is currently recruiting new Advocates. The Gender Violence Support Advocates (Advocates) Program is a network of dedicated and compassionate staff and faculty volunteers who are trained to assist students who are impacted by sexual assault, intimate partner abuse, stalking, sexual exploitation, and sexual harassment. In their role, Advocates provide initial support and referrals to campus and community resources and reporting options and then help students navigate all their options. Serving as an Advocate requires, among other responsibilities, an initial 10 hour training, monthly meetings, being on-call, and attending campus gender violence prevention events. If you are interested in serving as an Advocate, please contact Dr. Brooke DeSipio, Director of the office of Gender Violence Education and Support at bed4@lehigh.edu to learn more about the position.

Tuesday, May 28
10am

Join Lehigh Libraries for a Web of Science session presented by Laura Britton and Kristen Faeth of Clarivate Analytics on Tuesday, May 28 from 10:00-11:00 a.m. in Linderman Library 302. Web of Science is a citation search platform that enables you to find journal articles relevant to your research, build bibliographies, find collaborators, and assess a publication’s impact on subsequent research. The session will cover advanced searching, new features, and "Journal Citation Reports," which helps assess the research impact of various journals. Attendees can also learn about "Publons", which you can use "to track your publications, citation metrics, peer reviews, and journal editing work in a single, easy-to-maintain profile." You can access the database from Lehigh’s library databases list at: https://library.lehigh.edu/ Attendees can stay after the session and ask any detailed questions relating to their particular use of Web of Science. Please register. Contact Brian Simboli, Science Librarian at x5003 or brs4@lehigh.edu to register or if you have any questions.

Linderman Library 302

Tuesday, May 28
10am

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Tuesday, May 28
2pm

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Wednesday, May 29
12am

Important Fiscal Year End information for 2018-2019 is now available on the Controller's Office website under the NEW ITEMS section. A .pdf version of the information is available, along with a Google calendar version.

Wednesday, May 29
9am

1 Million Cups is an event that brings together the Lehigh Valley entrepreneurial community over coffee and conversation.

Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Wednesday, May 29
10am

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Wednesday, May 29
11am

Enjoy fresh grilled-to-order lunch with a live accoustic performance by Chris Lebresco at the Common Grounds Patio! Grill Open - 11:00am - 1:30pm Live Music - 11:30am - 1:00pm

Rauch Business Center Common Grounds Patio

Wednesday, May 29
2pm

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Thursday, May 30
10am

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Thursday, May 30
10am

Fresh produce/local vendors, right on campus! Come to the Bethlehem Farmers' Market every Thursday, May 2 - Oct 31, 10 am - 2 pm, in Farrington Square. Come stock up on fresh produce AND support this community service.

Farrington Square Courtyard

Thursday, May 30
2pm

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Friday, May 31
12am

Created exclusively by students, the Epitome is one of Lehigh’s most prominent commemorative records – this year marks the 143rd edition. More than just a memento, it’s a window looking back at this year's Lehigh experience. Please purchase online before May 31, 2019.

Friday, May 31
10am

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Friday, May 31
8am

This program is designed for mid-level working professionals. Negotiation is a part of everyday life. It is also an essential part of being a manager. In the business world, negotiation skills are the foundation of a successful career and a productive workplace. Without proper negotiation skills, people often fail to pursue their goals or settle for an outcome that is far less than it could be. Yet, formal training in this critical skill is not a requirement. The chances are that despite years of experience negotiating with your superiors, subordinates, co-workers, suppliers, customers or stakeholders, you did not have formal training in negotiations. In this Lehigh University Executive Education workshop you will build effective foundation for successful negotiations and learn to achieve your business and personal goals through advanced negotiation tactics. Learn more and register! Pogram cost is $1060. Cost includes all materials and meals.

Friday, May 31
2pm

In the Group Information Session, an Office of Admissions staff member will share stories about how our motivated students are challenged, engaged and inspired by faculty mentors. Other topics covered include Lehigh’s flexible approach to education, research opportunities and the value our community places on diversity and personal growth. The presentation will touch on the city of Bethlehem, the vibrant Lehigh Valley and the supportive Lehigh Family. Admissions and financial processes, campus traditions and Lehigh’s history of strong career placement are also discussed. Many topics and facilities that are particularly important to first-year students and their parents are included in the student-guided Campus Tour. Residence life, dining, extra-curricular activities, course workload, relationships with professors, and student support services are all discussed. Highlights of the tour of Asa Packer Campus include Linderman Library, an academic classroom, a residence hall and Zoellner Arts Center. Register now >

Alumni Memorial Building

Friday, May 31
7pm

Dancers from Pennsylvania Youth Ballet and professional guest artists will appear in this production, with choreography by Artistic Director Karen Kroninger Knerr; including an original puppet by Mock Turtle Marionette Theatre. One of the best-loved comedic ballets, Coppélia is an enchanting tale about a mad inventor and the life-like doll he creates. When a village boy becomes infatuated with the doll (thinking it’s a real girl!), his fiancée becomes unhappy. The ensuing mix-ups and misunderstandings between the two young lovers sets the stage for plenty of hilarity. With colorful costumes and joyful dancing, this ballet is sure to delight both young and old alike! Coppélia features the beautiful music of Léo Delibes, a French composer of the Romantic era, who specialized in ballets, operas, and other stage works. He influenced some of the greatest composers, among them Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, Debussy, and Drigo. Click HERE for PYB website. BUY TICKETS

Zoellner Arts Center Baker Hall